Outstanding and Standing out Jewish believers in Yeshua: the Anima of Hans Herzl

One of the topics on my site is “Theodor Herzl and his tragic family.” In Herzl, King of the Jews,” I described Theodor dreaming about fitting out his son, Hans, his lowly tormented son, in the grubby regalia of a medieval ghetto Jew and crowning him, Duke, Doge, Doxe, Prince, King,  of the Most Serene Judenstaat.

Frank Yulish lists 52 Jews who became believers in Yeshua. He says: “I could list many more, but these 52 are outstanding.” Hans, the son of Theodor Herzl, is one of them. Here is the entry on Hans:

“Hans Herzl, son of Theodore Herzl (founder of modern Zionism), commits suicide after growing up at an Orthodox Jewish boarding school, coming to faith in Messiah, undergoing tremendous abuse, and then retreating to liberal Judaism. The Baltimore Jewish Times honestly reports that “when Herzl’s son became a convert to Christianity – not for material gain, but because he believed that if the idea of Jewish nationalism is thought to its final conclusion one can be a Christian Jew – he was read out of Jewry. The death of … Herzl reminds us that in many instances “we are ruthless fanatics.”

What would be the normal understanding of an “outstanding” doctor, an “outstanding” speaker, an “outstanding” actor, and so on? The obvious answer is that the doctor, speaker, actor, and so on, excel at what they do. We would, therefore, assume that an “outstanding Jewish believer in Yeshua” would definitely not mean a Jewish believer in Yeshua who abandons his belief in Yeshua. But, not only did Hans abandon his belief in Yeshua, he, unlike all of the other 52 “outstanding” believers in Yeshua mentioned on the list, committed the ultimate act of despair, by taking his own life. Hans should, arguably, not appear on the list of 52, because the term “outstanding” applied to him is a misnomer. The more appropriate description for Hans is not “outstanding” but “standing out.” He not only stands out from most Jewish believers in Yeshua worldwide, but he also stands out from the 52 “outstanding” ones on the list.

We previouslly read (above) that when Hans converted to Christianity…he was read out of Jewry.” Most of Jewry will not bat an eyelid at a Hare Krishna Jew or an atheist Jew. On thing it will not tolerate is a baptised Jew – having done so willingly, of course.

 

Frank Yulish lists 52 Jews who became believers in Yeshua. He says: “I could list many more, but these 52 are outstanding.” Hans, the son of Theodor Herzl, is one of them. Here is the entry on Hans:

1930 – Hans Herzl, son of Theodore Herzl (founder of modern Zionism)
Hans Herzl, son of Theodore Herzl (founder of modern Zionism), commits
suicide after growing up at an Orthodox Jewish boarding school, coming
to faith in Messiah, undergoing tremendous abuse, and then retreating to
liberal Judaism. The Baltimore Jewish Times honestly reports that “when
Herzl’s son became a convert to Christianity – not for material gain,
but because he believed that if the idea of Jewish nationalism is
thought to its final conclusion one can be a Christian Jew – he was read
out of Jewry. The death of … Herzl reminds us that in many instances
we are ruthless fanatics.”

What would be the normal understanding of an “outstanding” doctor, an “outstanding” speaker, an “outstanding” actor, and so on? The obvious answer is that the doctor, speaker, actor, and so on, excel at what they do. We would, therefore, assume that an “outstanding Jewish believer in Yeshua” would definitely not mean a Jewish believer in Yeshua who abandons his belief in Yeshua. But, not only did Hans abandon his belief in Yeshua, he, unlike all of the other 52 “outstanding” believers in Yeshua mentioned on the list, also committed the ultimate act of despair, by taking his own life. Hans should, arguably, not appear on the list of 52, because the term “outstanding” applied to him is a misnomer. The more appropriate description for Hans is not “outstanding” but “standing out.” He not only stands out from most Jewish believers in Yeshua worldwide, but he also stands out from the 52 “outstanding” ones on the list.

Yulish might have been totally unaware that Hans stood out like a wounded anima among the other 51 “outstanding” believers in Yeshua. I would, however, be Fulish to put my head on a block over the matter.