How many battalions make boots (on the ground)?

What the US president said he meant by “no boots on the ground,” was no “battalions” on the ground. One battalion consists of between 300 – 800 boots. So, when we hear “boots” we should understand that 299 “boots” do not mean “boots.” But we know that there are at least 300 boots on the ground. Maybe the sum of bits of different battalions don’t qualify as a battalions?

We battle on.

http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/12/obama-boots-on-the-ground/418635/

Retired? What are you doing with your time? Preparing for death and life

In the affluent West, If you’re retired, you must have been asked many times what you do with yourself. Well, I think about God a lot, read a lot, write a bit, cook a lot and practice my classical guitar a lot; I must master the tremolo before I die. What am I doing all this for? Simple, I’m preparing for death and life – eternal life.

No matter what a Christian’s age, the main job is to renew the mind, that is, to become eternally minded. “Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is–his good, pleasing and perfect will” (Romans 12:2).

Dying, I live. The hard part of dying is working out my salvation in fear and trembling. Why do I tremble? Because it is Christ who works in me.

Philippians 2

1 So if there is any encouragement in Christ, any comfort from love, any participation in the Spirit, any affection and sympathy, 2 complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. 3 Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. 4 Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. 5 Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus,[a] 6 who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, 7 but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant,[b] being born in the likeness of men. 8 And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. 9 Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, 10 so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 11 and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

12 Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, so now, not only as in my presence but much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling, 13 for it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure.

How long will South Africa last?

“THE short answer to the question that is the title of RW Johnson’s new book, How Long will South Africa Survive?, is roughly two years.
That is when, he suggests, given the increasingly dire state of the economy, the country, cap-in-hand, will approach the International Monetary Fund for a bail-out which, in turn, will result in a regime change of some kind.
It’s a scenario he unpacked at the Cape Town Press Club recently as part of the hurly burly of public engagements to promote the book. It will more or less be like this:
Unemployment would continue to soar. The budget and trade deficits would continue to rise. Foreign investment along with domestic capital would continue to leave the country. Downgrading by the ratings agencies would continue, resulting in the inevitable junk bond status. With that, the cost of our debt will sharply rise to a point where it may become impossible to service the debt at all.”

Read on http://www.politicsweb.co.za/news-and-analysis/south-africas-looming-crisis.

Facebook: “Friends” and the stoking of envy

“We are told that this new digital world is making all of us more connected, more social. Social media dominates our lives, and even if it can easily be perverted to the anti-social, self-gratifying purposes of Greed as I discussed in a previous article, it does serve as a genuine means of fostering and multiplying relationships. Little wonder, then, that with the explosion of the “social,” we should find this quintessentially social vice of Envy rearing its ugly head. Part of the problem is simply that we are likely to have many more “friends,” or at least acquaintances, than we would have had before. If it is our friends whom we are most likely to envy, most likely to compare ourselves with and to compete for reputation with, then the more we have, and the more whose accomplishments we keep track of, the more occasions we will have for envy” (Brad LittleJohn).

http://www.reformation21.org/articles/the-seven-deadly-sins-in-a-digital-age-v-envy.php


					

Sloth in the digital age

You can’t be irredeemably slothful if you knuckle down to read this excellent piece. For one, it shows you have not totally acceded to the sorrow for spiritual good and so lost all desire for excellence.

The Seven Deadly Sins in a Digital Age: 4. Sloth
ARTICLE BY W. BRADFORD LITTLEJOHN NOVEMBER 2014

Here are the first two paragraphs:

When we come to the subject of Sloth in a Digital Age, the diagnosis might seem obvious, if a tad moralistic. We are all familiar with the couch potato glued to the TV screen, or the teenager who neglects his homework for video games, or her homework for Instagram. In the modern world, we are taught to work only for the sake of attaining leisure, and digital media have become our favorite source of leisure. The vice of sloth, then, we deem, is the sin of laziness, of failing to be as productive as God calls us to be.

For all its apparent familiarity, though, perhaps none of the traditional vices is so unfamiliar to us as Sloth. Indeed, our English word is quite insufficient; the actual Latin name for the vice is acedia, a word for which there is really no good translation. Aquinas’s formal definition of the vice–“sorrow for spiritual good”–will probably only confuse us still further. But let us try to unpack it. “Sloth,” says Aquinas, “is an oppressive sorrow, which . . . so weighs upon man’s mind, that he wants to do nothing” (ST IIaIIae Q. 35 a. 1 resp.). More specifically, it is “sorrow in the Divine good about which charity rejoices” (ST IIaIIae Q. 35 a. 2 resp.). “Sorrow” here means less an active sadness and more an apathetic lack of love and joy, above all, a lack of joy in God, a disposition that is deadly indeed.
– See more at: http://www.reformation21.org/articles/the-seven-deadly-sins-in-a-digital-age-4-sloth.php#sthash.Bm4XcT32.dpuf