The Protocols of the Elders of Zion: forged in the crucible of truth

I enjoy Bill Still’s videos. In one of his recent ones he argues that “The Protocols of the Elder’s of Zion” is fiction. He is probably right. But Orwell’s “1984” is also fiction. And what do we experience today? “1984” morphing into fact. And thus, argues David Duke it also is with “The Protocols of the elders of Zion.”

Bill Still maintains that if you take the Jewish bankers out of the equation, nothing will change. David Duke argues, with evidence, otherwise.

Why are “1984” and the “Protocols” so gripping? Duke says because they convey devastating truths. Both books, at our peril, should not be banished to the shelf.


A shelf-hating Jews

How many battalions make boots (on the ground)?

What the US president said he meant by “no boots on the ground,” was no “battalions” on the ground. One battalion consists of between 300 – 800 boots. So, when we hear “boots” we should understand that 299 “boots” do not mean “boots.” But we know that there are at least 300 boots on the ground. Maybe the sum of bits of different battalions don’t qualify as a battalions?

We battle on.

Retired? What are you doing with your time? Preparing for death and life

In the affluent West, If you’re retired, you must have been asked many times what you do with yourself. Well, I think about God a lot, read a lot, write a bit, cook a lot and practice my classical guitar a lot; I must master the tremolo before I die. What am I doing all this for? Simple, I’m preparing for death and life – eternal life.

No matter what a Christian’s age, the main job is to renew the mind, that is, to become eternally minded. “Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is–his good, pleasing and perfect will” (Romans 12:2).

Dying, I live. The hard part of dying is working out my salvation in fear and trembling. Why do I tremble? Because it is Christ who works in me.

Philippians 2

1 So if there is any encouragement in Christ, any comfort from love, any participation in the Spirit, any affection and sympathy, 2 complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. 3 Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. 4 Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. 5 Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus,[a] 6 who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, 7 but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant,[b] being born in the likeness of men. 8 And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. 9 Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, 10 so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 11 and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

12 Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, so now, not only as in my presence but much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling, 13 for it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure.

How long will South Africa last?

“THE short answer to the question that is the title of RW Johnson’s new book, How Long will South Africa Survive?, is roughly two years.
That is when, he suggests, given the increasingly dire state of the economy, the country, cap-in-hand, will approach the International Monetary Fund for a bail-out which, in turn, will result in a regime change of some kind.
It’s a scenario he unpacked at the Cape Town Press Club recently as part of the hurly burly of public engagements to promote the book. It will more or less be like this:
Unemployment would continue to soar. The budget and trade deficits would continue to rise. Foreign investment along with domestic capital would continue to leave the country. Downgrading by the ratings agencies would continue, resulting in the inevitable junk bond status. With that, the cost of our debt will sharply rise to a point where it may become impossible to service the debt at all.”

Read on