“Holy Serpent of the Jews ~ Texe Marrs”

Much of what Texe Marrs says in this video is correct. One statement needs correction: He says that the EIN (AYN) in EIN (AYN) SOF means “eye.” Texe you are confusing EIN (AYN) with AYIN (eye). AYN means “no” – AYN SOF “No End” (the “Endless One” – God).

It’s true, of course, that God is also the “All-seeing Eye.”

Save me from the time of trial: Wrap me in a warm blanky

The Anglican version of “Lead me not into temptation” is “Save me from the time of trial.” Since when does God save us FROM the time of trial. The Bible is bursting with verses that say that trials are the name of the game. For example, “These things I have spoken to you, so that in Me you may have peace. In the world you have tribulation (troubles, trials, sorrows), but take courage; I have overcome the world” (John 16:33).

“Save us IN the time of trial” would be better. “Trial,” however, is not the correct translation; “temptation” is the correct translation. You might say that the latter cannot be the correct translation, because it says in James 1:13, “Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am being tempted by God”; for God cannot be tempted by evil, and He Himself does not tempt anyone.”

What is going on? I’m a bit stumped. Charles Spurgeon’s sermon on “Lead us not into temptation” – I listened to it twice – did not help. John Calvin sheds more light:

“And lead us not into temptation Matthew 6:13 – Some people have split this petition into two. This is wrong: for the nature of the subject makes it manifest, that it is one and the same petition. The connection of the words also shows it: for the word but, which is placed between, connects the two clauses together, as Augustine judiciously explains. The sentence ought to be resolved thus, That we may not be led into temptation, deliver us from evil The meaning is: “We are conscious Of our own weakness, and desire to enjoy the protection of God, that we may remain impregnable against all the assaults of Satan.” We showed from the former petition, that no man can be reckoned a Christian, who does not acknowledge himself to be a sinner; and in the same manner, we conclude from this petition, that we have no strength for living a holy life, except so far as we obtain it from God. Whoever implores the assistance of God to overcome temptations, acknowledges that, unless God deliver him, he will be constantly falling that he may not reel at every blow.

The word temptation is often used generally for any kind of trial. In this sense God is said to have tempted Abraham, (Genesis 22:1) when he tried his faith. We are tempted both by adversity and by prosperity: because each of them is an occasion of bringing to light feelings which were formerly concealed. But here it denotes inward temptation, which may be fitly called the scourge of the devil, for exciting our lust. It would be foolish to ask, that God would keep us free from every thing which makes trial of our faith. All wicked emotions, which excite us to sin, are included under the name of temptation Though it is not impossible that we may feel such pricks in our minds, (for, during the whole course of our life, we have a constant warfare with the flesh) yet we ask that the Lord would not cause us to be thrown down, or suffer us to be overwhelmed, by temptations.

In order to express this truth more clearly, that we are liable to constant stumbling and ruinous falls, if God does not uphold us with his hand, Christ used this form of expression, (μὴ εἰσενέγκὟς,) Lead us not into temptation: or, as some render it, Bring us not into temptation It is certainly true, that “every man is tempted,” as the Apostle James says, (1:14 ) “by his own lust:” yet, as God not only gives us up to the will of Satan, to kindle the flame of lust, but employs him as the agent of his wrath, when he chooses to drive men headlong to destruction, he may be also said, in a way peculiar to himself, to lead them into temptation In the same sense, “an evil spirit from the Lord” is said to have “seized or troubled Saul,” (1 Samuel 16:14:) and there are many passages of Scripture to the same purpose. And yet we will not therefore say, that God is the author of evil: because, by giving men over to a reprobate mind,” (Romans 1:28) he does not exercise a confused tyranny, but executes his just, though secret judgments, though the reason of them may be unknown to us.” (End of Calvin).

References

Charles Spurgeon “Lead us not into temptation” 1. Audio
2. Text PDF .

John Calvin – Text

The blood of our Shepherd

From “Blood Work” by Carter, Anthony – On this good Friday, I think of those who have abandoned Christ for Noahidism (The Seven Laws of Noah; see http://www.noahide.net).

“All things seem to go against you, and it seems that your punishment awaits you every morning. There is “depression” in the land, and in vain do you walk the streets of the city to find employment that you may provide for your family. Whatever savings you were able to lay up for such times are soon consumed. You lose your home. You are forced to live on “relief,” or on charity. What is your only comfort? That soon the evil days may be over and prosperity will return to the land? No, but that you belong to Christ! Sickness attacks your frame and day after day, week after week, month after month, you travel a way of suffering. What is your only comfort? That there are physicians and means to alleviate your suffering; or that you may look forward to recovery? No, but your consolation is that you belong to Christ! Death enters your home and takes away a dear child, tearing it from your very heart. And again, your only, mark you well, emphatically your only comfort is that you are not your own, but belong to your faithful Saviour Jesus Christ!…Your relationship to Christ is always sufficient.” Start reading this book for free: http://amzn.to/1Rklh2X

For fear of the Jews (Jewish leaders?): off the hook?

I examined four verses of 24 English translations of John’s Gospel: the New International Version (NIV), New Living Translation (NLT), International Standard Version (ISV) and Net Bible. In these four translations the Greek Ἰουδαῖος Ioudaios “Jews” is translated Jewish leaders. I use the four verses of the NIV as an example:

John 1:19
Now this was John’s testimony when the Jewish leaders in Jerusalem sent priests and Levites to ask him who he was.

John 7:1
After this, Jesus went around in Galilee. He did not want to go about in Judea because the Jewish leaders there were looking for a way to kill him.

John 7:13
But no one would say anything publicly about him for fear (phobia, Greek phobon φόβον) of the Jewish leaders.

John 20:19
On the evening of that first day of the week, when the disciples were together, with the doors locked for fear of the Jewish leaders, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you!”

To repeat: the original Greek in all these verses is “Jews,” (Ἰουδαῖος Ioudaios) not “Jewish leaders.

These translations add “leaders” for at least three reasons:

  1. Political correctness – We don’t want to offend anybody, in this instance, the Jews. We don’t want to be accused of hate speech, so let’s botch what the original text really says.
  2. The people (the led) should not be blamed for what their leaders do. After all, many Christians argue, the Jews remain the apple of God’s eye, so if you want to be blessed. you’d better bless the Jew; and so, it doesn’t matter to God if they despise Jesus Christ. Don’t you know they want to destroy Christianity, indeed, destroy or subjugate the Goyim (Gentiles), which the Jews (Jewish leaders?) are doing in the US of A. God, as some of the recent popes have said, doesn’t care if Jews skip or skirt Christ; your brief as Christians or Gentiles is to hang, ten at a time, onto the skirt of a single Jew, as he chaperones you towards the truth and the light.
  3. For fear of the Jews. Question: How do we infer from the original text that the people (the led) in the context of, for example, “for fear of the Jews,” were not fearsome? “Jews” in all these verses could mean 1. only the Jewish leaders or 2. many Jews, or 3. most Jews. (We discount “all” Jews). As we can never know which option this side of eternity, we have no right to change the original.

There is one verse in the New Testament where it is indeed clear that only the Jewish leaders are implied:

“Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing.” “Jerusalem” refers to the Jewish leaders, and “your children” to those they lead.

In sum, in the New Testament, when the Greek original says “Jews,” should we read “the Jewish leaders” (usually a negative connotation in the NT) instead of “Jews?” Not unless you want to whitewash Jewish non-leaders for one or more of the three reasons mentioned above.